It’s a sign I tell you
15th Jul 2009
More Coffee Training
22nd Jul 2009

Coffee shops generate tons of coffee waste each year and most of this ends up in landfill. So we thought this makes no sense and is not good for the environment. So our plan is to keep the coffee waste and give it away to our customers. Now you may be wondering what the hell will our customers do with the used coffee, well glad you asked that. Here are some options:

  • Use it as a garden compost. The grounds should account for no more than 25 percent of the composting matter and a teaspoon of lime or wood for each 5 pounds of grounds can be added to balance out acidity levels.
  • Make a liquid fertilizer: Diluting coffee grounds with water creates an excellent liquid fertilizer. Mixing one half pound can of coffee grounds into a 5-gallon container of water is recommended.
  • Apply coffee grounds directly to your plants: Before watering your outdoor plants, layer your soil or target garden areas with coffee grounds. Plants such as azaleas, rhododendrons, ferns, roses, gardenias, blueberries, cranberries, oaks, and spruces respond well to coffee-ground mulch. You can also sprinkle the grounds directly on the soil of potted houseplants.
  • Use coffee grounds as a natural pest deterrent: Surround plants sensitive to pests, especially worms, with a mixture of coffee grounds and eggshells. This acts as a natural repellent and keeps worms well fed and happy without having to resort to chemical pesticides.
  • Use steeped grounds and a cotton swab to touch up furniture scratches.
  • Skin Pack – use a handful of old grounds, mixed together with a bit of water (or cream for added moisturizing) and create a messy paste of this in a small bowl. Pat this goopy mixture onto clean skin, being careful to avoid nose, mouth and eyes. Let sit for about 15 minutes and rinse off

1 Comment

  1. pigsonthewing says:

    Great ideas – but (Earth)worms are not pests; they're one of gardeners' greatest allies. Did you perhaps mean slugs?